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Film-Array-Machine(NaturalNews) Common sense would lead you to believe that the U.S. government would be doing everything in its power, now that Ebola has reached American shores, to combat the deadly virus. But if you assumed that, you would be mistaken.

Most people don’t know that there is an Ebola screening machine; it is currently available to the U.S military, and the military is using it now. So why aren’t U.S. hospitals using it? Because government guidelines prevent hospitals from doing so.

According to military news site Defense One:

It’s a toaster-sized box called FilmArray, produced by a company called BioFire, a subsidiary of bioMerieux and it’s capable of detecting Ebola with a high degree of confidence — in under an hour.

Incredibly, it was present at Dallas Presbyterian Hospital when Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan walked through the door, complaining of fever and he had just come from Liberia. Duncan was sent home, but even still, FDA guidelines prohibited the hospital from using the machine to screen for Ebola.

Government bureaucracy preventing its use

The machine sells for about $39,000 a piece and is capable of screening for the genetic markers of a number of respiratory, gastrointestinal and other pathogens, and that includes the Ebola virus. However, it has to have the correct “kit” in place.

And right now, current guidelines from the Food and Drug Administration prohibit hospitals — including the Dallas hospital where Duncan was treated and where two of his nurses became infected — from getting that kit. “That’s despite the fact that it can provide results with higher than 90 percent certainty and it’s one of the machines that the military is currently using to screen for Ebola in Africa,” Defense One reported.

The FilmArray works by performing polymerase chain reaction tests to see if Ebola is present, based on a set of genetic markers. A company official told the military news site, “It will take the Ebola cells, break them open, expose the [ribonucleic acid] in the Ebola and match those with a target we’ve identified.” The device works using either blood or saliva samples.

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